Question Description

In this discussion do a brief analysis of Sheryl Sandberg’s interview with Eric Schmidt using the Ethic of Care. Specifically point out a few of her examples and apply Gilligan’s principles. This section does not have to be long, but please don’t generalize. After a minimum half page analysis, reflect on your own experiences of what Sandberg is claiming and give your own thoughts. This discussion is less formal than some of the others so in the second half use it as you like. Post your first discussion by the end of Thursday and two thoughtful responses by the end of Sunday. I look forward to reading your experiences.Please watch this episode of Undercover Boss and do an Ethics of Care analysis on Jimbo, Marcee, and Colby. Specifically point out places when Ethics of Care was followed or violated. Do not generalize. In the last paragraph compare and contrast this analysis with the previous three theories. Use the vocabulary of Carol Gilligan and the principles found in the texts. Undercover Boss US S01E02 Hooters Name:Undercover Boss US S01E02 Hooters.mp4 (42:18) Duration:42:18 Added:30 Aug 2014 11:31 AM Added By:Jake Thibault Description: Tags:bbuser jake thibaultPlease watch this episode of Undercover Boss and do an Ethics of Care analysis on Jimbo, Marcee, and Colby. Specifically point out places when Ethics of Care was followed or violated. Do not generalize. In the last paragraph compare and contrast this analysis with any of the previous four theories. Use the vocabulary of Carol Gilligan and the principles found in the texts.There should be a short introduction and conclusion with 4 substantive paragraphs. Jimbo analysis Marcee analysis Colby analysis Compare and contrasting at least one other theory with Ethics of Care. You can break from this format a little but do it with intentionality. Make sure you cover at least those four topics I’ve presented.

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1. In this discussion do a brief analysis of Sheryl Sandberg’s interview with Eric Schmidt using the Ethic of
Care. Specifically point out a few of her examples and apply Gilligan’s principles. This section does not
have to be long, but please don’t generalize. After a minimum half page analysis, reflect on your own
experiences of what Sandberg is claiming and give your own thoughts. This discussion is less formal
than some of the others so in the second half use it as you like. Post your first discussion by the end of
Thursday and two thoughtful responses by the end of Sunday. I look forward to reading your
experiences.
2. Please watch this episode of Undercover Boss and do an Ethics of Care analysis on Jimbo, Marcee, and
Colby. Specifically point out places when Ethics of Care was followed or violated. Do not generalize. In
the last paragraph compare and contrast this analysis with the previous three theories. Use the
vocabulary of Carol Gilligan and the principles found in the texts.
Undercover Boss US S01E02 Hooters
Name: Undercover Boss US S01E02 Hooters.mp4 (42:18)
Duration: 42:18
Added: 30 Aug 2014 11:31 AM
Added By:
Jake Thibault
Description:
Tags:
bbuser jake thibaultPlease watch this episode of Undercover Boss and do an Ethics of Care analysis
on Jimbo, Marcee, and Colby. Specifically point out places when Ethics of Care was followed or violated. Do not
generalize. In the last paragraph compare and contrast this analysis with any of the previous four theories. Use
the vocabulary of Carol Gilligan and the principles found in the texts. There should be a short introduction
and conclusion with 4 substantive paragraphs.
Jimbo analysis
Marcee analysis
Colby analysis
Compare and contrasting at least one other theory with Ethics of Care.
You can break from this format a little but do it with intentionality. Make sure you cover at least those four
topics I’ve presented.
The paper should be 2 pages long 12pt Times New Roman font, double spaced, and 1 inch margins. Please
submit if below on Turnitin.
When Carol Gilligan began doing her research with female subjects, she noted that their responses didn’t seem
to fit neatly in Kohlberg’s framework. It’s not that the responses couldn’t be squeezed into that framework, but
rather that something essential and distinctive was lost in the process and other things were misinterpreted or
misvalued. Gilligan’s study showed, first, that women tended much more often than the men of Kohlberg’s
studies to see the moral life in terms of care rather than justice, in terms of responsibility rather than rights.
Whereas men see problems as moral issues when they involve competing claims about rights, women see
problems as moral issues when they involve the suffering of other people. Whereas men see the primary moral
imperative as centering on treating everyone fairly, women see the moral imperative as centering on caring
about others and about themselves. Men typically make moral decisions by applying rules fairly and impartially,
whereas women are more likely to seek resolutions that preserve emotional connectedness for everyone.
Similarly, men tend to look back and to judge whether a moral decision was correct or not by asking whether
the rules were properly applied, whereas women tend to ask whether relationships were preserved and
whether people were hurt.
These differences in ethical responses tend to reflect deeper differences between men and women,
differences in the way in which they conceive of the self. Men are much more likely to see the self in terms of
autonomy, freedom, independence, separateness and hierarchy. Rules guide the interactions among people,
and roles establish each individual’s place in the hierarchy. In contrast, women tend to see the self in terms of
relatedness, interdependence, emotional connectedness, and responsiveness to the needs of others.
Ethics of Care falls partially within the consequentialist framework, placing it with utilitarianism
and egoism. Gilligan reacts against the cold rationality of the Enlightenment to a postmodern world view with
differing voices and no clear answers. Gilligan is seeking happiness as a result of her ethic but unlike egoism, it
is not entirely selfish or like utilitarianism which seeks an impartial happiness for the greatest number. Ethics
of Care can make irrational decisions whereby one may sacrifice for the good of another the way a mother
sacrifices for her family. The mother does not sacrifice herself for the good of the world but for the good of the
ones she loves. This is partially altruistic in her selflessness towards her family but it is self interested as well,
in that one’s family is tied to one’s own identity and legacy. Diotima in Plato’s The Symposium calls children a
form of immortality. Ayn Rand in next week’s lesson might disagree that being a mother is altruistic since she
might get a great deal of satisfaction out of motherhood and sacrificing for one’s children is not selfless but
instead, ultimately rewarding. This can certainly be debated.
Unlike many of the earlier Enlightenment theories with a clear set of principles and maxims, Ethics of
Care is a little more difficult to nail down. It is not a rule based ethic so we cannot turn to a set of rules to
understand it. This is a normative theory of ethics so there is an element whereby the Ethic of Care is telling us
what we should be doing. There is an imperative involved. When you read these texts, keep in the forefront of
your mind the question, what are the principles? Make a list of the vocabulary and principles you are uncovering
so that you can apply them to the Sandberg and Hooters assignments. You will need these principles next week
too, so hold on to your notes. It won’t be enough just to repeat what I typed above so take the reading seriously
and read it analytically.
Before concluding, be aware that this work is a little dated when it comes to nuances of feminist
thought today. Gilligan published her findings in the 1982 work titled In a Different Voice: Psychological
Theory and Women’s Development. This work was a result of over a decade of research and writing from
women in secret, in fear that if men in their field discovered their work before it had been fully worked out that
they would be blacklisted as quacks and not real scientists. Gilligan and her colleagues were not challenging
the whole male establishment or the binary gender stereotypes, but rather were just trying to make the claim
that moral development between men and women are often different and women are not wrong for failing to
fit within an Enlightenment framework. Gilligan contend that feminine ethics is just as valid as the traditional
form of ethics. When you review Sandberg’s interview you may even find that there are many business
advantages to the feminist ethic since mothers are competent and efficient with their time and resources.
The text this week includes an introduction to Ethics of Care. I am relying more heavily on an interview with
Sheryl Sandberg as an example of the modern-day issues with sexism in the workplace. Sandberg talks candidly
about the challenges of the stereotypes about being a woman in the workplace which men do not have to deal
with. Women are perceived to leave work for extended periods of time to bare and raise children whereas
men are not perceived to have that same interruption. Sandberg like Gilligan before her points out that
women handle leadership differently than men, using a more collaborative approach and focusing far less on
individual accomplishments. Sandberg explains that this approach might lose a woman the promotion because
she does not advocate for her own talents the way men are trained to do; however, women might produce
better results and a better working environment. Sandberg does not blame these problems on men claiming
that women are just as skeptical of other women taking on masculine forms of communication and self
promotion. Sandberg’s solution to the problem is that we must train society from an early age not to shame
women into passive roles and train sons to view their female friends as equally strong and competent. In the
true fashion of Ethic of Care, Sandberg makes claims that we should also learn to respect the way that women
engage the workplace and perhaps men could start to mimic the feminine traits a bit more. Listen, teamwork,
care for colleagues, and an integration of family and business life make a company stronger, therefore, the Ethic
of Care model has a valuable role in modern society. This is week 1 of 2 on Gender so there will be more in the
following week.
Required Readings:
Textbook Chapter 11, 250-269
Video: Sandberg Watch on C-Span or Youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WWumJF1dEY
Ethics: A Pluralistic Approach to Moral Theory, 306-333 Download

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