Question Description

2. Discuss the role of a technical specialist who might be needed to advise the IC (incident commander) in this setting. Choose any specialist you think appropriate. Be specific and thorough when you discuss the role.Reading Assignment1. Liberty County Plan EOP – ESSD Section 82. ESSD Section 9 – Resource Management Plan2. Relevant appendices

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MAIN TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0. Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1
2.0. Community Profile …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 1
3.0. Hazard/Vulnerability Analysis (HVA) ……………………………………………………………………….. 1
4.0. Columbia Disaster and Emergency Services Act …………………………………………………………. 1
5.0. Liberty County Disaster and Emergency Service Ordinance 92-651………………………………. 1
6.0. Central City Disaster and Emergency Service Ordinance 92-468 …………………………………… 1
7.0. Central City/Liberty County Declaration of Disaster/Emergency …………………………………. 1
8.0. Liberty County Basic Emergency Plan ……………………………………………………………………….. 1
9.0. Resource Management Plan ……………………………………………………………………………………… 1
Appendix A. Key Facilities and Critical Workers ………………………………………………………………. 1
Appendix B. Information Listing …………………………………………………………………………………….. 1
Appendix C. Emergency Management ……………………………………………………………………………… 1
Appendix D. Communications …………………………………………………………………………………………. 1
Appendix E. Fire Service ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 1
Appendix F. Law Enforcement ………………………………………………………………………………………… 1
Appendix G. Emergency Medical Services ………………………………………………………………………… 1
Appendix H. Liberty County Medical Resources ……………………………………………………………….. 1
Appendix I.
Public Health ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 1
Appendix J.
Public Works/Utilities Organizations …………………………………………………………….. 1
Appendix K. Private Sector Resources ………………………………………………………………………………. 1
Appendix L. Transportation …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 1
Appendix M. Park and Recreation Resources ……………………………………………………………………… 1
Appendix N. Mass Care, Housing and Human Services ………………………………………………………. 1
Appendix O. Special Facilities ………………………………………………………………………………………… 1
Appendix P. Shelter Information …………………………………………………………………………………….. 1
Appendix Q. Educational Facilities ………………………………………………………………………………….. 1
Appendix R. Animal and Agriculture Services …………………………………………………………………… 1
Appendix S. National Guard – Unclassified ………………………………………………………………………. 1
Appendix T. Disaster Recovery Center Locations ………………………………………………………………. 1
Appendix U. Federal Programs ………………………………………………………………………………………… 1
Appendix V. Media Resources ………………………………………………………………………………………… 1
Appendix W. Glossary and Terms ……………………………………………………………………………………. 1
Appendix X. Authorities and References ………………………………………………………………………….. 1
Appendix Y. Acronyms and Abbreviations ……………………………………………………………………….. 1
Appendix Z. Maps and Diagrams ……………………………………………………………………………………. 1
Appendix AA. Organization Charts, Checklists, and Forms ……………………………………………………. 1
Exercise Simulation System Document
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1.0 INTRODUCTION
The Exercise Simulation System Document (ESSD) has been prepared for the United States (U.S.)
Department of Homeland Security (DHS)/Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for use by the
Emergency Management Institute (EMI) and other training and exercise organizations at the national, State,
local, tribal, territorial governments, the private and nonprofit sectors, and the public.
The ESSD is a compilation of information and resources that would typically be available in any
community as they respond to and manage an emergency or disaster in a local community. EMI understands
that not all communities are set up like the community described in this document. However, emergency
responders and organizations may adapt the ESSD, as appropriate, in support of community-specific
exercises and training events.
The ESSD provides support for exercises ranging from the very simple to increasingly complex with
participation of all levels of government (i.e., Federal, State, tribal, county, and local). When combined with
scenarios, the ESSD facilitates the Incident Action Planning process and allows students to practice the onscene and off-scene coordination required by the National Incident Management System (NIMS) within the
structure of an Emergency Operations Center/Multi-Agency Coordination Center (EOC/MACC).
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2.0 COMMUNITY PROFILE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
2.1. State of Columbia Profile ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
2.1.1. General Description …………………………………………………………………………………………… 3
2.1.2. State Map………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4
2.1.3. Roaring River Tribal Community (RRTC) …………………………………………………………….. 5
2.1.4. Population ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6
2.1.5. Government ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7
2.1.6. Transportation…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8
2.1.6.1.
Airports ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8
2.1.6.2.
International Airport ……………………………………………………………………………………. 8
2.1.6.3.
Regional Airports ………………………………………………………………………………………… 8
2.1.6.4.
General Aviation Airports…………………………………………………………………………….. 8
2.1.6.5.
Seaport ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8
2.2. Liberty County Profile ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9
2.2.1. General Description …………………………………………………………………………………………… 9
2.2.1.1.
Coastal Liberty County ………………………………………………………………………………… 9
2.2.1.2.
Liberty County Beaches and Marshes ………………………………………………………….. 10
2.2.1.3.
Liberty Plateau ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11
2.2.1.4.
Mineral Mountains …………………………………………………………………………………….. 11
2.2.1.5.
Albertville ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11
2.2.2. Liberty County Map …………………………………………………………………………………………. 13
2.2.3. Liberty County Demographics …………………………………………………………………………… 14
2.2.4. Population ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16
2.2.5. Liberty County Land Use ………………………………………………………………………………….. 18
2.2.6. Civilian Labor Force………………………………………………………………………………………… 20
2.2.6.1.
Residence-Based Employment ……………………………………………………………………. 20
2.2.6.2.
Establishment-Based Employment ………………………………………………………………. 18
2.2.7. Central City Map……………………………………………………………………………………………… 19
2.2.8. Central City Demographics ………………………………………………………………………………. 19
2.2.9. Central City Population Zones …………………………………………………………………………… 23
2.2.9.1.
Central City Land Use ……………………………………………………………………………….. 24
2.2.10. Central City Construction Types ………………………………………………………………………… 26
2.2.11. Liberty County Government ………………………………………………………………………………. 26
2.2.12. Liberty County Government Organizational Chart ………………………………………………. 27
2.2.13. Central City Government ………………………………………………………………………………….. 27
2.2.14. Central City Government Organizational Chart ………………………………………………….. 28
2.2.15. Governments of Other Communities in Liberty County …………………………………………. 29
2.2.16. Transportation…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 29
2.2.16.1. Roads……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 29
2.2.16.2. Railroads ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 30
2.2.16.3. Airport ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 30
2.2.16.4. Seaport …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 30
2.2.17. Large Venues …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 32
Community Profile
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2.2.17.1. Liberty Coliseum ………………………………………………………………………………………. 32
2.2.17.2. Convention Center …………………………………………………………………………………….. 30
2.2.17.3. John Chapman County Fairgrounds……………………………………………………………… 30
2.2.17.4. Liberty County Fairgrounds ………………………………………………………………………… 30
2.2.17.5. Fluman Sloane Stadium ……………………………………………………………………………… 33
2.2.18. Major Employers ……………………………………………………………………………………………… 33
2.2.19. Educational Facilities ………………………………………………………………………………………. 36
2.2.20. Hospitals in Liberty County ………………………………………………………………………………. 37
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2.1. State of Columbia Profile
2.1.1. General Description
The State of Columbia is roughly rectangular in shape and is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and
one State to the east, Canada to the north, Mexico to the south, and two States to the west.
Columbia includes portions of three major natural regions of the United States: the Coastal Plain, the
Liberty Plateau, and the Mineral Mountains. The Coastal Plain occupies about one-fifth of the State
and rises gently to 500 feet from the Atlantic Ocean up to the Liberty Plateau. Included in the
Coastal Plain are the Sea Islands off the coast of Columbia. The Liberty Plateau is an upland area
that rises gradually from 400 feet to 1,200 feet along the northwestern edge. The Liberty Plateau is
separated from the Coastal Plain by a major fault line. The Mineral Mountains in the northwestern
corner of Liberty County meet the Liberty Plateau. This area of the county is a mountainous and
mainly forested region. The land gradually flattens moving east in Columbia.
All of the major rivers in Columbia flow generally south and southeastward across the State to
the Atlantic Ocean. The four major rivers in Columbia are the Turtle River, Roaring River, the Big
Blue River, and the Lonely River. There are no large natural lakes in Columbia besides Wolf’s
Lake on the northern border, but several large lakes have been created for hydroelectric power
purposes. The largest lakes are Lake Kilgore, Lake George, Lake Modor, Deer Lake, East Lake, and
Guilz Lake.
Columbia’s coastline extends 110 miles. However, if all bays, inlets, and islands are considered,
the overall coastline measures 950 miles.
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2.1.2. State Map
Figure 2.1. State of Columbia Map
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2.1.3. Roaring River Tribal Community (RRTC)
RRTC has a population of 7,375 and is situated in the State of Columbia. It covers an area of
about 1,200 square miles. It spans four counties: Liberty, Green, Kane, and Mineral. There are
approximately 5,000 enrolled members living within the exterior boundaries of the tribal
reservation. The population remains fairly constant throughout the year with no seasonal shifts. The
rest of the population (2,375) within the tribal community is non-tribal members who provide goods
and services within the tribal area.
Figure 2.2. Roaring River Tribal Community Map
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2.1.4. Population
The current population of Columbia is 2,694,412. This population is spread among counties
including the population of 1,232,000 in major cities as follows:
County
Apple
Cass
George
Grand
Granite
Green
Hamilton
Johnson
Kane
Laye
Liberty
Lober
Mineral
Pine
Redstone
Stramford
Witcher
Total
Population (2010 Census)
22,000
76,000
124,500
550,000
130,000
196,000
95,500
87,000
75,000
85,000
302,412
82,000
26,000
545,000
98,000
145,000
55,000
2,694,412
Table 2.1. Columbia Population by Counties
City
Triangle
Porter
Metropolis
Jamestown
Monroe
Zurich
Clifton
Central City
Capital City
Brooksville
Tower Beach
County
Cass
George
Grand
Granite
Green
Green
Kane
Liberty
Pine
Redstone
Stramford
Total
Population (2010 Census)
55,000
67,500
225,000
83,000
80,000
85,000
60,000
149,000
265,000
62,500
100,000
1,232,000
Table 2.2. Population of Major Cities in Columbia
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2.1.5. Government
Columbia has the standard State-level political structure (Governor, Lieutenant Governor,
Secretary of State, Attorney General, etc.). It also has a cabinet-level disaster preparedness and
emergency response organization. The State maintains a State Office of Trade to support activities
in its most important industries.
Figure 2.3. State of Columbia Government Organizational Chart
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2.1.6. Transportation
As befitting a trade nexus, Columbia has a rich network of State roads and Interstate highways.
Interstate 102 (I-102) cuts across the State from northwest to southeast and connects Capital City
in Pine County with Central City in Liberty County. The interstate continues east to Monroe where
it follows the coast to the northeast. Interstate 107 (I-107) goes from the northern-most part of
the State in George County south through Metropolis in Grand County to Central City in
Liberty County. From Central City, I-107 continues south where it terminates in Bayport on
Masland Island. Numerous, well maintained State roads connect population and recreation centers
throughout the State. Rail lines also connect the major commercial and industrial areas of the State.
In the northern part of the State, a commercial rail line connects Metropolis with Brooksville in the
east, with Capital City in the southwest, and with States located west of Columbia. In the south, a
rail line connects Central City with Monroe and Clifton to the east and northeast and with Bayport
and Tower Beach to the southwest and south. Train traffic also is routed to Mexico through Tower
Beach and to Canada through Hot Springs. Light rail systems support the transportation needs of
Central City, Capital City, and Metropolis. Major seaports, an international airport, and several
regional airports support the transportation needs of Columbia residents and businesses.
2.1.6.1. Airports
There are nine airports in Columbia. There is one international airport, four regional airports and
four general aviation airports located in eight Columbia Counties.
2.1.6.2. International Airport
Liberty International Airport in Kingston includes a full international terminal handling both
passengers and freight. Connecting flights connect Kingston with Capital City, Metropolis, and
other regional airports through Columbia and the United States.
2.1.6.3. Regional Airports
Columbia regional airports are located in Monroe, Clifton, Capital City, and Metropolis. These
airports handle both passengers and freight. All Columbia regional airports have connecting flights
to Liberty International, Atlanta, and Cincinnati.
2.1.6.4. General Aviation Airports
Columbia general aviation airports are located near the towns of Annville, Wexler, Phillipboro, and
Holdrese. These small single runway airports handle business and private planes from across the
country but no commercial flights. They handle Federal Express (FedEx) and United Parcel
Service (UPS) aircraft daily but no other regular freight.
2.1.6.5. Seaport
The Bayport Seaport is located on the eastern end of Masland Island. It has separate facilities for
passenger and cargo vessels. During World War II (WWII), national strategic requirements resulted
in the construction of an oil refinery in Bayport at the eastern tip of Masland Island. This refinery
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Exercise Simulation System Document
has recently received a major upgrade that increased its overall efficiency. There is a major fuel
depot servin …
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